Thursday, May 31, 2012

Top of the Heap!

In the wake of Memorial Day, Monday's Riddle reminded us how truly wonderful it is to feel free. Lizzy then railroaded us back to the 1800's, sharing her thoughts about another side of the tracks in her review of Freedom Crossing by Margaret Goff Clark. Last night, we were chatting on the phone and ended up on the topic of the freedom of speech and its importance. Banned books came up and we checked out the list. There were quite a few titles that really caught our attention. But, here are two that we just couldn't get over...

This weeks top of the heap: Fabulous Banned Books! 



Fairday: I truly find it bizarre that James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl is on the banned book list. This is one of the most fun, creative stories I have ever read. Poor little James, living with his horrid aunts, doing all their chores. What's better than him saving a spider, planting a magic bean, and then soaring away to freedom on a giant, juicy peach accompanied by enormous and charismatic insects? It's a wild journey and a rush of an adventure! Hard to believe that anyone wouldn't want to read it- right?  ~ F

★★★


Lizzy: After reading through a few of the different lists of banned and challenged books I realized that some of my favorite books could be found on one list or another! Since there are so many fabulous ones on the list I decided to spotlight the book that I am most shocked to find there. This was tough because most of the stories I have read I can’t say enough great things about. Some books that are on the list don’t surprise me because I know that some people don’t like books about witches (Harry PotterThe Chronicles of Narnia, etc.)- even if I don’t agree. The book that I was most shocked by was The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein. I can’t figure out why this book would be challenged. Every time I read it I think about love and the lengths people will go to for those they care about. I always find the story sad and touching at the same time. I think the boy should be nicer to the tree, but I see how much the boy means to the tree. Looking through banned and challenged books- what did I learn? I learned that I am thankful that everyone has the freedom to write what they want so we can have all of the wonderful books to read!  

HAPPY READING! 






22 comments:

  1. +JMJ+

    I confess that I find it hard to get worked up about banned books in this day and age, when so much information is available on the Internet and banning a book only guarantees the opposite of what its challengers intended: that it will be widely read.

    A few months ago, a friend who knows I love Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction asked me to recommend good books for his daughter. After agreeing to do it, I found myself in the uncomfortable position of censor, rereading books I had personally enjoyed and seeing problematic elements in all of them. What I learned from the experience was that if you're looking for questionable content, then you're guaranteed to find it. And the actual quality or morality of the book isn't going to matter to you.

    That's my problem with book banning. Not the act itself, which has become pretty meaningless, but the narrow way of looking at books which they imply. A book does not become good just because it's "clean"--and I can think of many so-called "clean" books that are just inane.

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    1. +JMJ+- I agree with you that banning a book usually means more people will want to read it. You brought up many excellent points about banning books and how we look at books! ~F

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  2. Banning books makes me sick! Especially when I see books like these on the list. Have people forgotten that our country is founded on Freedom of Speech? If you don' tlike a book don' t read it, but don't ruin the privelage for others. If anything banning books makes people want to read them more.

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    1. Heidi- Like you, I find bannng books to be a bad idea. Freedom of Speech is so important! I think more books get sold when a book is banned or challenged. It makes people curious! ~F

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  3. I had no idea that James and The Giant Peach was on any banned books lists. How strange! I love Roald Dahl's books :)

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    1. Nikki-ann- I love Roald Dahl books, too. It is fascinating to see the books that are banned or challenged! I was shocked by so many of them! ~F

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  4. lol. James and the Giant Peach for approving positive anti-authority behavior. Why is the Giving Tree sexist? Whaaa....!!?? I need to read that again because apparently I missed something... These are just wow.

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  5. What?! Ridiculous!!! It just makes me think that there are some sadly crabby people in this world who might have way too much time on their hands. Sheesh.

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  6. I don't really understand why they feel the need to ban books, it just makes people want to read them more to see why it's banned!

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  7. Sometimes I think that the more a book is banned, the better the book is. Books often get banned because the concept or writing was more creative or challenged conventional thinking. It makes me want to get a banned book list and read through the titles I haven't yet read :)

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    1. Amy- What interesting points you bring up! I want to read my way through a banned books list, too. So nice to have you stop by! ~Jess

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  8. I have read both of these books and can't believe they have been on a banned list. I don't guite understand why people feel the need to ban books. Don't read what you don't want to read.

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    1. Flex- The fact that they are both on the list confuses me, too! I loved both of them! ~F

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  9. What a crazy list – I had no idea James and the giant peach was included - madness! The giving tree is beautiful – how on earth can it be considered sexist?

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    1. Barbara- Having these books on the list is madness. Reading the reasons for the books being banned is even crazier. It has reinforced for me- to read and decide on my own. :) ~F

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  10. The banned book list always makes me furiously twitchy. How dare some people use their freedom of free expression to limit the intellectual freedom of others...Madness, I tell ya.

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    1. Angela- I can understand why the lsit makes you twitchy (I love that expression). It is madness! :) Thanks for stopping by!

      ~F

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  11. Isn't it amazing how closed minded some people are. My guess is, none of them even read the books they've banned.

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