Thursday, November 8, 2012

Top of the Heap!


Let's talk some turkey!
Monday's Riddle was the key to discovery, and Lizzy's Review of Blood on the River: James Town 1607 by Elisa Carbone took us into the New World. Friday, we will be chatting with Matthew Cody, author of the middle grade novel Powerless, and we look forward to hearing your thoughts on The DMS Wants to Know.

Discovering a new world is exciting! There is so much to explore, and around every corner the unknown becomes known. Our history is rich and textured, but there's still a wealth of knowledge to be gained about the world we live in. Sometimes there will be conflict, but once communication and understanding are established, anything is possible!

This week's top of the heap: Settling into the New World ; )


Fairday: I love learning about Pocahontas. I find her story to be fascinating. It's interesting to think about the two very different worlds that she lived in and the perspective that she gained from being the daughter of a tribal chief, and then the wife of an English tobacco planter. She was said to have saved Captain John Smith from punishment by her tribe and was presented to English society as a "civilized savage" in hopes of stimulating investments in the Jamestown settlements. Her tale is an engaging one, and I enjoy watching the Disney movie with my family this time of year.


On another note, just because we are on the topic of new worlds and discovery, I thought I would include a musical interlude that always reminds me of what it must have been like to come in to the New World. It's about the Mason Dickson Line. Enjoy! ~ F

Sailing to Philadelphia by Mark Knopfler and James Taylor ♫ ♪♩♬ 




Lizzy: Squanto's Journey: The Story of the First Thanksgiving is one of the best picture books I have read about Thanksgiving and the settlers. The author focuses on Native Americans in his writing, and I love the authenticity he brings to his stories. Learning about the first Thanksgiving from Squanto’s point of view was different than anything I have ever heard about the event. Seeing through the eyes of a Native American at that time gave me a whole new perspective on the events that took place and the tradition that has become so important to our country. This book is touching and honest. The illustrations add a lot to the experience. This is a picture book that will get you thinking! ~ L


The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth by Brownscombe

14 comments:

  1. I remember reading Squanto in grade school! Pocahontas is another great tale, even though it is sad. I cannot believe we are almost to Thanksgiving. Now I want pie thanks to your picture!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Heidi, Isn't that such a delicious looking pumpkin pie! Thanks for stopping by to share your thoughts with us. Historical characters are always so fascinating : ) ~ F

      Delete
  2. I loved the turkey picture and the highlighting of Thanksgiving/Pilgrim focused books. World-building and creating an interesting setting is important whether it's spec-fic or historical. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lexa, So true! Thanks so much for popping over to visit- always lovely to hear from you : ) ~ F

      Delete
  3. There are so many intriguing tales of first encounters between the Europeans and the First Nations people - must have been an interesting time!

    Also - you won the Helen Lacey giveaway over at my blog - I'll email you the info! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jemi, It was definitely a fascinating time period. Thanks so much for the giveaway! Great to hear from you : ) ~ F

      Delete
  4. The story of Squanto fascinates me. Pocahontas does, too, but I hate the Disney version. Did you know that Captain Smith was only, like, five foot four and had a real abrasive personality? He was a great soldier, though. And Pocahontas was probably only about nine years old when she saved him. Also, Jamestown (Smith and Pocahontas) was several hundred miles and thirteen years away from Plymouth (Pilgrims and Squanto). Jamestown has nothing to do with Thanksgiving. Sorry, don't want to be a know-it-all, but, hey, I write historical fiction. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michelle- Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing some history with us! We have been enjoying spotlighting the early settlers and the Native Americans this week. Over many years and miles there were relationships between the settlers and Native Americans that we continue to learn from today. It is amazing when you think about it!

      I agree with you! Fairday loves the Disney version of Pocahontas, but it isn't my favorite Disney movie either. :) I know the story is much more detailed and I found it fascinating what I learned about her in social studies. We actually watched the Disney version to compare and contrast what Disney got right and wrong about the story. It was so cool!
      ~L

      Delete
  5. I love the stories of both Pocohantas and Squanto. I've been up in Idaho where they have a museum to Pocohantas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donna- I love their stories! How exciting that you have been to the Pocohantas museum in Idaho. I would enjoy visiting that museum! ~L

      Delete
  6. Pocahontas was married to someone else! Thank you. Disney... lying to me. Her life was just filled with new discoveries and new situations. I don;t think I would have appreciated them so much... I would want to stay in my home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adriana- I know! The Disney version is quite different from the facts. I can relate to wanting to stay home. :) ~L

      Delete

Thank you for stopping by and commenting. We love to hear your thoughts! Fairday's Blog is no longer accepting awards. We appreciate all the nominations that we have received and are honored to have been mentioned! Happy Reading!

Twitter Bird Gadget Twitter Bird Gadget